Ludovic Florent's series “Poussières d’étoiles” (Stardust). 

(Source: ladylanabanana, via amagicgoldenflower)

nonabones:

genderfluidsirius:

no but kids from pureblood families going through embarrassing weaboo phases except they become obsessed with muggle pop culture

5th years carrying around pink razr phones from 2004 and awkwardly inserting “text speak” into daily conversations

11 year olds carrying plush carebears backpacks into transfiguration

everyone of them using outdated muggle slang incorrectly, making all of the muggleborns wince in pain

that is so fucking cute and hilarious

(via amagicgoldenflower)

mostlycatsmostly:

(via vader76)

mostlycatsmostly:

(via vader76)

(via yakdad)

awwww-cute:

I have to use a decoy keyboard to get any work done

awwww-cute:

I have to use a decoy keyboard to get any work done

(via yakdad)

third-eyes:

staceythinx:

Science-inspired necklaces from the Delftia Etsy store

(via scientificillustration)

cpecod:

have you ever had the urge to spoil somebody and buy them everything they’ve ever wanted because they are just so wonderful and you love them a lot and they deserve all of the nice things??? then u realize u are broke and sad

(via zaxal)

ghoulgaarden:

shower me in various black items of clothing and hundred dollar bills

(Source: hexgurls, via lallowethyu)

(Source: 89cats, via yakdad)

(Source: stephisanerd, via yakdad)

"We praise people for being “naturally” smart, too, “naturally” athletic, and etc. But studies continue to show, as they have for some time now, that it is generally healthier to praise schoolchildren for being hardworking, than for being naturally gifted. We know now that to emphasize a child’s inherent ability places pressure on that child to continue to be accidentally talented, which is something that is hard for anyone to control. When the children who are applauded for their natural skills fail, they are shown to take the failure very personally. After all, the process of their success has always seemed mysterious and basic and inseparable from the rest of their identity, so it must be they who are failing as whole people. When students are instead complimented and rewarded for their effort and improvement, they tend to not be so hard on themselves. When they fail, they reason, “Well, I’ll work harder next time.” They learn that they are capable of success, rather than constantly automatically deserving of it, and they learn simultaneously that they are bigger and more complex than their individual successes or failures."

Kate of Eat the Damn Cake, The Stupidity of “Natural” Beauty (via theimperfectascent)

I lost whole years of my life to self-loathing and self-sabotaging because I couldn’t sustain being ‘gifted’.  Don’t make the same mistake.

(via mossonhighheels)

This is so, so important for teachers to understand. I try, in every report card, to focus on effort, not natural ability. And you know what? It makes a big difference in my classroom.

(via sanityscraps)

Holy hell, it finally happened - I posted this quote and OVER FORTY THOUSAND NOTES LATER IT SHOWED UP ON MY DASH AGAIN

:)

(Source: eatthedamncake.com, via yakdad)